Reasons to Stay

REASONS WHY BRITAIN’S FUTURE IS IN THE EU

 

1. Jobs

Around 3.5 million British jobs are directly linked to British membership of the European Union’s single market – 1 in 10 British jobs.

2. Exports & investment

The EU buys over 50 per cent of UK exports (54 per cent of goods, 40 per cent of services).
Over 300,000 British companies and 74 per cent of British exporters operate in other EU markets.
American and Asian EU firms build factories in Britain because it is in the single market.

3. Trade

The EU negotiates trade agreements with the rest of the world. Outside the EU Britain would have to renegotiate trade deals alone. While the EU is the world’s largest market, a UK outside the EU would not be a high priority for other counties to negotiate a trade deal.

4. Consumer clout

British families enjoy lower mobile phone roaming charges, lower credit card fees, cheaper flights and proper compensation when flights are delayed or cancelled. These sorts of benefits could not be achieved by Britain alone.

5. Clean environment

Through commonly agreed EU standards, national Governments have achieved improvements to the quality of air, rivers and beaches. Good for Britain and good for Britons holidaying or living abroad!

6. Power to curb the multinationals

The EU has taken on multinational giants like Microsoft, Samsung and Toshiba for unfair competition. The UK would not be able to do this alone.

7. Freedom to work and study abroad – and easy travel

1.4 million British people live abroad in the EU. More than 14,500 UK students took part in the European Union’s Erasmus student exchange scheme in 2012-13. Driving licences issued in the UK are valid throughout the EU.

8. Peace and democracy

The EU has helped secure peace among previously warring western European nations. It helped to consolidate democracy in Spain, Portugal, Greece and former Soviet bloc countries and helped preserve peace in the Balkans since the end of the Balkans War. With the UN it now plays a leading role in conflict prevention, peacekeeping and democracy building.

9. Equal pay and non-discrimination

Equal pay for men and women is enshrined in EU law, as are bans on discrimination by age, race or sexual orientation. This benefits Britain and British people who live in other EU countries.

10. Influence in the world

As 28 democracies, and as the world’s biggest market, we are strong when we work together.
Britain is represented in many international organisations in joint EU delegations – giving Britain more influence than it would have alone. The EU has played a major role in climate, world trade and development.

11. Cutting red tape

Common rules for the common market make it unnecessary to have 28 sets of national regulations.

12. Fighting crime

The European Arrest Warrant replaced long extradition procedures and enables the UK to extradite criminals wanted in other EU countries, and bring to justice criminals wanted in the UK who are hiding in other EU countries.

Eurojust helps UK authorities work with other EU countries’ to tackle international organised crime such as drug smuggling, people trafficking and money laundering.

...and one bonus...

13. Research funding

The UK is the second largest beneficiary of EU research funds, and the British Government expects future EU research funding to constitute a vital source of income for our world-leading universities and companies.


Showing 378 reactions

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  • It wouldn’t surprise me that those bums in Bruxelles will slap another £3 billion surcharge on us before we go.
    We are still in it for 2 years and they can still pick our pockets whenever they like.
    ( Rdd … who’s phoning you up re your pension and how much are you paying ?… If you hand over your wallet for somebody else to look after …. you’re asking for trouble )
  • From Today’s Papers.
    It appears Cameron was underestimating the negative

    Q. Is the price of the weekly shop going to go up? by Ruki Sayid, Consumer Editor
    A.There’s no easy way to say it – Brexit is bad news for families who now face a 3% hike at supermarket checkouts, adding £120 a year to shopping bills.
    The longterm is just as gloomy as farmers and food manufacturers lose EU subsidies and with no Government plans to replace them on a like-for-like basis, costs will be passed on to consumers.
    For millions already struggling to put food on the table, higher grocery bills will be hard to swallow.

    Q. Is this good or bad news for the NHS? by Andrew Gregory, Health Editor
    A. The short answer is it’s not clear yet. The NHS Confederation, which represents 85% of NHS providers and commissioners insisted it was “impossible to predict the full impact at this stage”.
    But its chief executive Stephen Dalton warned it was “vital” the Government now get a “strong” deal with Europe that “recognises how interwoven NHS and EU policies have become”.
    Senior midwives, doctors and nurses all expressed fears that Brexit will hit NHS funding.
    One thing is certain. Brexit will not mean an extra £350million a week for the NHS saved from contributions to the EU. Nigel Farage admitted the Leave campaign’s claim was a “mistake” and he “can’t” guarantee the NHS will get any extra cash.
    In fact, it’s far more likely to receive less cash in the short term. This would mean fewer doctors, fewer nurses, and longer waiting times for patients.
    Q. What will happen to house prices and my mortgage? by Graham Hiscott, Business Editor
    A. The Brexit vote could have a big impact on the housing market. If it leads to another financial crisis, then it could drive up lenders’ funding costs which, in turn, might mean dearer mortgages for new borrowers.
    Q. Will the price of petrol increase? by Colin Goodwin expert
    A. Crude oil is traded in dollars so if Sterling is weak the price we pay for petrol at the pumps is going to go up. If the pound rallies quickly and goes back to the value it was before Brexit then we’re unlikely to see any difference in prices. But there is concern Britain may be charged a higher oil price than the EU, particularly by Russia.
    Q. What will happen to my pension? by Tricia Phillips, Personal Finance Editor
    A downturn in the economy will mean bigger pressures on the public purse strings and this could mean those relying on the state pension are in for a nasty shock, if the Government pulls the plug on the Triple Lock, which guarantees a minimum 2.5% increase to the state pension each year.
    Meanwhile the rest of us still in work could end up having to literally work ‘til we drop before any sign of our state pension. Already the age we have to keep grafting to is 66, rising to 67 in 2026 but Brexit could now trigger a faster rise in state pension age.
    Q. Will my holiday be more expensive? By Nigel Thompson Travel Editor
    A. In the short term, yes. Sterling’s slump means your spending power in the eurozone and USA particularly is way down.
    In the longer term, nobody knows. Much depends at what levels the pound stabilises. If it stays low, the cost of hotel rooms etc to tour operators will rise, and no doubt be passed on to the consumer.
    Q. Will Brexit a win for terrorists? by Chris Hughes, Defence and Security Editor
    A. Britain has two main security concerns, the first from Russia and its allies and the second is from Islamic State.
    President Putin will be emboldened by a Europe diminished by Britain’s departure because his biggest fear is a strong and united Europe supported by America.
    Putin sees Britain as a threat, as his constant probes towards our airspace and coastline, prove.
    Q. What does Brexit mean for Premier League football? by Dave Kidd
    A. At present European Union players are not subject to the same work permit restrictions as the rest of the world – and around 60 per cent of players starting matches are non-British. …. In short, footballers are not the sort of immigrants Boris Johnson and Nigel Farage dislike – and right-wing politicians will always find loopholes for the wealthy.
    Q. What will happen to my savings? by Tricia Phillips, Personal Finance Editor
    A. Cash in bank accounts and building societies covered by the Financial Services Compensation Scheme is safe, up to £75,000 per person per account. However, if you have money in stocks and shares ISAs and other investments your balance may have taken a dive.
  • Sorry Barry – not employed by anyone. I’m one of those pensioners who will now have to go back to work as my life’s saving are pretty much worth nothing.
    Don’t gloat just yet. The referendum like all such votes was advisory only. It has no place in law and the government still has to pass a motion to invoke Article 50.
  • WELL rdd and aimeee you are now SACKED as your job employed by PRO EUROPA is over .Your claims put voters off and you were both losers !!!Now dont sulk or get nasty ,just accept that when the people think they are not being listened to,they vote with their feet 74% turnout !!!
  • In the hours following the Britain’s vote to leave Europe the second most Googled quest was … ‘What is the EU?’
    Vote Jeremy Khyle for Chancellor.
  • Keith – free from what? How is leaving the EU going to empower you to have any great impact on the UK than you already have. Also, we are still in the EU until, it seems, the EU kicks us out.
  • So will this be a remake of the fall of the roman empire or will something more exciting being lined up for us. Feels good to be free again.
  • A Leave spokesperson said, on Wednesday night, we could be like New Zealand and build our economy as they did when it was depressed following the UKs involvement with the Common Market.
    It took them 40 years to get back to the same level as when we left.
  • Well all I can say is thank god you lost now we can start building our country back up
    This is the start of a new UK.
  • Nah….These drops are typical of knee-jerk stock market reaction on receipt of perceived bad news. You watch, this will all recover within a couple of months, and Cameron already bowed out, so they are pressing the right buttons, and finding a new leader among Boris, Gove, Patel etc.

    As regards the final referendum result, this is very good news for Britain, despite what others might think. You watch… The City will flourish, and nobody will elope to continental waters. EU is effectively going broke without the UK in it. Others are now rumbling for a referendum (Holland, France et al), says a lot if they want a vote on whether to stay in this economic utopia, doesn’t it. Beginning of the end for the EU. Watch. Liberate the people of Europe, and UK will do very well…just you watch.
  • The arse has fallen out of my bank shares in the panic.
    Buying as many as I can ….. the hysteria will subside by next tuesday. You think?
    Already had a ‘phone call telling me I may as well hold on to the few shares I have as they’re almost worthless. Afraid to check my pension.
  • The arse has fallen out of my bank shares in the panic.
    Buying as many as I can ….. the hysteria will subside by next tuesday.
  • Post Brexit
    The first person to say £350,000,000 a week won’t be going to the NHS? Farage.
    The first to call for our elected government to be overturned by a Brexit Government? Farage.
    The first benefit from Brexit after betting a £1,000 on the result? Farage.
    Hopefully NI, Scotland and London will leave the little englanders to wallow in the mire of their making.
  • Already I note the successful Brexiters are saying ‘Well of course we wont do anything before 2020 and it will take some time before we trigger Article 50 of the treaty to commence the exit procedure – They cant blame the EU anymore, because they have said ’Out is Out’ and should commence immediately.

    Oh dear it doesn’t look as though the Brexiters have planned ahead? or expected to win.

    But alas Pandora’s Box has been well and truly opened and cant be shut.

    Remember Boris comment ’We wont have to leave!, as they will negotiate with us?

    I’m am sorry for the next generation and the fact, if its true, that seventy five percent of the younger generation voted to ‘Stay’.
  • Told you Arnold …. we are all liars and fans of Hitler … we are xenophobic because we want to trade with the world and make our own negotiations and in the process to harm poor Aimee’s family’s prospects.
    I don’t know how people like us are allowed to walk the Earth.
    Anyway … looking forward to becoming instantly skint in the morning and picking up some bargains when British manufacturing goes bankrupt…… It’s an ill wind …. my favourite saying.
  • Arnold – the whole brexit campaign has been built on lies and xenophobia.

    To answer your question – no, we won’t have to pay. You know it, but you thought you’d try another…let’s just say it and see if a sucker laps it up… statement. Very sad.
  • Allow me to take another pee into the wind then….What happens when the next european or worldwide recession occurs, and Spain, Portugal and Italy really do run out of money? Will Britain have to pay?

    And Aimee, I’ve never mentioned immigration in any of my arguments….immigration doesn’t bother me personally.

    But having said that, while it sounds very lofty and idyllic to have an open door and let people immigrate to the UK in potentially significant numbers, for the country to have no control and have unlimited immigration is quite frankly unsustainable. Immigration is indeed needed here in the UK, from workers in the NHS to the building industry among others, but to have this in potentially unlimited numbers wreaks havoc on public serivces, rents, cost of housing etc. For immigration to work successfully, (including provision for genuine refugees I might add), surely the government of the country needs to be able to regulate it, otherwise you’ll just have people coming over to take advantage of the system. Nothing racist or extreme right-wing views here, its called being sensible about it.
  • Georges – There has never been so many poor families in France since we are in the Europeen Union. A little insensitive but ‘39 – 45’ wasn’t great and the country was only saved from an inevitable civil war and / or further invasion because of co-operation that led to the EU. With our CAP rural France would be deserted.
    More recently -
    Poverty in France has fallen by 60% over thirty years.
    Although it affected 15% of the population in 1970, in 2001 only 6.1% (or 3.7 million people) were below the poverty line (which, according to INSEE’s criteria, is half of the median income).
    In the mid-Sixties, Jules Klanfer estimated that about 20% of the French population lived in poverty.
  • AimeeJ ‘Beppe – your lack of knowledge is sad. Opel is part of the American company General Motors. You seem to have a say anything and hope some suckers will believe it attitude. Very sad.’ Isn’t this how UKIP and Brexitters have conducted their entire programme?
  • Why we should Remain
    • A strong, dynamic economy. Between 1950 and 1973, the year that Britain joined the EU, our economy was the slowest growing in Europe and the G7 countries. Since 1973, we are the fastest growing – better than Germany, France and the US – and we have the highest ever rate of employment. Since the single market began in 1993, our GDP is up 62% in real terms compared to 48% in Switzerland and 35% in Germany. All reputable economic studies from the Treasury and the IMF to Oxford University and the London School of Economics show we would be worse off by tens of billions of pounds outside the EU. We have access to the single market and through the EU trade agreements with more than 60 other countries with more on the way. Nearly 50% of British trade is with the rest of the EU, and it is estimated that over three million jobs in this country are connected to membership. Businesses large and small are in favour of Remain.
    • A strong NHS. Funding for the NHS depends on having a strong economy. Over 100,000 people from other EU countries work in the NHS and social care, including 10% of doctors. NHS staff, management and scientists agree that we should Remain. Supporting Remain, the British Medical Journal stated ‘we could NOT name one prominent national medical, research, or health organisation that has sided with Brexit.’ TUC analysis shows that a vote to Leave the EU could cost the NHS 25% of its budget by 2019/20.

    Why brexit is wrong
    • Brexit would be an economic disaster for Britain, putting us in recession. If we left we wouldn’t save any money as the damage to the economy of cutting ourselves off from the market where almost half our exports go would cost us tens of billions of pounds. In negotiating a post-brexit agreement we need the EU more than they need us – we export over 12% of our GDP to the EU, but the EU only exports 3% of its GDP to us. What’s more, many foreign firms, like Nissan, set up shop in Britain because we are a gateway to sell stuff to the whole EU. If we quit, other countries might grab our jobs by luring companies away from the UK.
    • Brexit would wipe out manufacturing in Britain. The Brexit supporters want us to reduce our tariffs to zero without any agreement on lower tariffs from other countries. This means for example, China could flood our market with cheap steel and wipe out our steel industry. UKIP opposed support for the British steel industry in the European Parliament. Patrick Minford, the lead economist for the Brexit side, said in March, ‘Over time, if we left the EU, it seems likely that we would mostly eliminate manufacturing’. There are over 2.5 million jobs that are dependent on manufacturing in this country.
    • A weak Brexit economy, means cuts in public services and a weaker NHS. All major unions, including the NHS unions, are in favour of staying in as they know the damage brexit would cause the economy and therefore the NHS. 10% of doctors and over 100,000 NHS and social care staff come from other EU countries.
    • Don’t trust Brexit campaigners with the NHS or your rights. Boris Johnson wrote of privatising NHS services when he said: “If people have to pay for them, they will value them more,” and he has demanded the scrapping of the EU’s social charter which protects employment conditions. Michael Gove called for the NHS to be ‘denationalised’. Nigel Farage has said that the NHS should move towards an insurance-based system run by private companies and suggested that there was a big problem with employee rights and protections such as maternity leave. Arron Banks the millionaire backer and co-founder of the Leave.EU campaign in a recent interview stated: ‘If it were up to me, I’d privatise the NHS’.
  • Beppe – your lack of knowledge is sad. Opel is part of the American company General Motors. You seem to have a say anything and hope some suckers will believe it attitude. Very sad.
  • Arnold. I’ll tell you what’s more important than your right wing ideology. My family. That they have jobs, opportunities and live in an open and kind society. I don’t want far right ideology in government and on the streets. I don’t want a brexit ideology that hates foreigners and makes racists comments. I want a great Britain not a little England.

    Remain kind. Remain open. Remain inclusive. Remain tolerant. Remain together. Vote Remain.
  • Aimee … Volkswagen and Opel also got fined like Bamford on the same basis … but they are lovely German companies.
  • Arnold … mate .. you are pissing in the wind … hysterics are impervious to logic.
  • My bank shares have gone up again… Goldman Sachs and their mates who caused the crash in 2008 are seemingly betting on a Remain vote.
    I’ll make money either way …. you have to dodge a bit to keep the till ticking over…… money has no loyalty.
  • Nothing is more important than being able to have control of your own country, decide who the government is, and chuck em out if they don’t deliver. Having control of how the country spends its own money, and not handing it away to an expensive country club is paramount. Why oh why have we come so far in this EU nonsense? – Yes we can still coordinate with Europe on climate change, and issues which need to be dealt with at an inter-governmental level, but LET EACH COUNTRY DECIDE ITS OWN LAWS AND FISCAL POLICY AS IT DEEMS FIT FOR ITS PEOPLE. How one-size fits all can benefit all 500m people across 28 countries, each with its own attitude to money and cultural attitudes and different needs is a complete mystery to me.

    Seriously, it is destroying society in the less fiscally responsible countries, Portugal, Spain, Italy, oh…and I forgot to mention, what’s it called….Greece.

    Are my arguments not compelling? – Have I missed sometihng? – Oh, and check out another new video on what other Europeans think how we should vote?

    https://www.facebook.com/leaveeuofficial/videos/974597272638514/?pnref=story

    Please please please save ALL the people of Europe. Vote LEAVE.
  • You haven’t phoned Bamford to tell him he’ll be out of business then Aimee if the vote is Brexit ?
    It would be kind to let him know.
  • We are a French family for so many years we live under duress of europeen rules.The decisions taken in Brussels by officials can not take into account the interests of 28 countries of so different standards of living. There has never been so many poor families in France since we are in the Europeen Union. The European Union is an advantage for rich people only. We strongly recommend to our British friends to vote against staying in. Good luck.
  • Why we should Remain
    • A strong, dynamic economy. Between 1950 and 1973, the year that Britain joined the EU, our economy was the slowest growing in Europe and the G7 countries. Since 1973, we are the fastest growing – better than Germany, France and the US – and we have the highest ever rate of employment. Since the single market began in 1993, our GDP is up 62% in real terms compared to 48% in Switzerland and 35% in Germany. All reputable economic studies from the Treasury and the IMF to Oxford University and the London School of Economics show we would be worse off by tens of billions of pounds outside the EU. We have access to the single market and through the EU trade agreements with more than 60 other countries with more on the way. Nearly 50% of British trade is with the rest of the EU, and it is estimated that over three million jobs in this country are connected to membership. Businesses large and small are in favour of Remain.
    • A strong NHS. Funding for the NHS depends on having a strong economy. Over 100,000 people from other EU countries work in the NHS and social care, including 10% of doctors. NHS staff, management and scientists agree that we should Remain. Supporting Remain, the British Medical Journal stated ‘we could NOT name one prominent national medical, research, or health organisation that has sided with Brexit.’ TUC analysis shows that a vote to Leave the EU could cost the NHS 25% of its budget by 2019/20.
    • Security. The EU has helped to keep the peace in Western Europe since its foundation. Before 1945, Europe was regularly devastated by conflict and war. Economic interdependence now makes war unthinkable between member states. The EU has also promoted the consolidation and spread of liberal democracy, in post-war Germany and Italy, in post-authoritarian Spain, Portugal and Greece, and most recently in post-communist Central and Eastern Europe. For these reasons, the EU was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2012. The current and all former heads of NATO and 12 former heads of the British Armed Forces agree that UK membership of the EU is important in maintaining peace and security in Europe. The European Arrest Warrant has allowed us to return criminals to other EU countries and bring to justice here thousands of British criminals who had fled to Europe.
    • Science and research. These are boosted by joint scientific and university programmes across the EU and the free movement of scientists and engineers. Over 150 members of the Royal Society of scientists have said that leaving the EU would be ‘a disaster for science and universities.’ The heads of over 100 universities support remaining in the EU as do over 80% of students. Airbus in Broughton has highlighted that moving experts between their sites around Europe is vital for the way they work.
    • Opportunities for us and our children. You can freely travel, study, work and live anywhere in the EU. The right of free movement for EU citizens hugely benefits the UK. It boosts our economy and enriches us culturally. Universities in particular benefit from the rights of students and world-class researchers and teachers to move freely. Moreover, many hundreds of thousands of British people live, study and work in other EU countries. We will all be poorer if we lose this right. Young voters are overwhelmingly in favour of staying in the EU as they see these opportunities as a right which would go if we left the EU. There are as many UK citizens in other EU countries as there are people from other EU countries in the UK – we get just as much benefit.
    • Rights, protection and benefits. The EU is a force for progressive values. It champions our civil and political rights, and has outlawed discrimination based on gender, race and sexuality. The EU provides a guarantee for workers’ rights, women’s rights and equality throughout the EU. The EHIC card gives you free health protection when travelling anywhere in the EU, Open Skies has greatly reduced the cost of air travel in the EU and mobile roaming tariffs within the EU will soon be zero.
    • Britain leading in Europe and the world. Britain should be leading in the EU and across the world and our influence is amplified by being part of the EU. We have control over rules, opt-outs to protect our unique position and a veto on important matters such as new countries joining. Crucially, membership allows us to influence EU laws. It also allows us to play a role in reforming the EU’s institutions and procedures. Were Britain to leave the EU we would no longer have a say on deciding its rules or shaping its future. Through the EU we are a rule-maker on the single market, but outside we would be a rule-taker just having to accept the rules with no say.
    • Keep the UK together. Scotland, Northern Ireland, Gibraltar and the Falklands are all likely to vote heavily in favour of Remain. If we left, Scotland would call another independence referendum. It would be a disaster for Gibraltar and the Falklands as the vast majority of their exports go to the EU. Putting up a border between Northern Ireland and the Republic would according to the Irish prime minister endanger the stability of the peace process.
  • That was a quote from the top economist on the brexit side beppe, not me. Think on.

    Bamford got fined by the EU for ripping off customers across Europe and Dyson has a personal grudge agains the EU because of the level playing field on vacuum cleaner testing. Wonder why they’ve made their decisions…hmmmm :-)